Through the Looking Glass: A review of topsy-turvy junk food marketing regulations

A review of the topsy turvy world of the regulations that are supposed to (but don't) protect children from online marketing of junk food.

28/04/2013
Children's Food Campaign
978 1 903060 56 8 - 48pp - 2013

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Contents

Summary  

Chapter 1
Introduction – The digital extension of the CAP Code     
How food marketing influences children’s diets     
Weak regulation of food marketing      
Extension of the digital remit      
Review of the digital remit     
How companies market junk food to children online     
Ministerial challenge and our ‘Super Complaint’     
ASA’s response to our ‘Super Complaint’     

Chapter 2
The Complaints – CAP Code deficiencies     
Analysis of the complaints and the ASA’s responses     
TV adverts online     
Brand characters    
Advergames    
Health Claims    
Age restrictions  

Chapter 3
The complaints process – Down the rabbit hole    
Episode 1 – The Fanta Bounce    
Episode 2 – Round the Twist(er)    
Episode 3 – Doritos’ superheroes     
Episode 4 – Nesquik’s bunny bites back    
Episode 5 – The battle over the Battle of the Breakfasts   

Chapter 4
Why is it going wrong?  Times have changed but the ASA and the CAP Code have not    
The medium has changed     
How we use it has changed    
Parental supervision and responsibility    
The impact of online advertising    
The regulator has barely changed  

Chapter 5
Widespread concerns about the ASA    
Breastmilk substitutes – ASA fails to protect babies and their families    
Alcoholic drinks – ASA fails to apply the spirit of its Code    
Weight loss miracles – ASA fails to curb false hope  

Chapter 6
Conclusions and recommendations    
Conclusions    
Recommendations  

Appendix 
List of websites included in Children’s Food Campaign ‘Super Complaint’ to the Advertising Standards Authority on 9 February 2012
    
References    

 

 

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